Identity Studies

Char Kunkel (department head)

Identity Studies (IDS) is an interdisciplinary academic program devoted to the critical analyses of identities and embodied knowing. IDS celebrates embodiment and cultural expressions, creates context for seemingly disparate identities, and exposes intersectionality, while moving toward the goal of a fairer and more equitable society. The program offers courses that investigate the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and the body as they are created, experienced, and used to delineate systems of power and domination.

The mission of Identity Studies is to empower students to create the practice of employing multiple perspectives, to increase understanding of self and other, to appreciate diversity, and to understand systems of power in order to challenge them. Identity Studies prepares students to be critical advocates, activists, scholars, and educators for social justice in a variety of professions. Faculty with specializations in Africana Studies, Asian Studies and Women and Gender Studies are housed here.

Required for a Major: The major consists of 10 courses plus senior project (38 credit hours). Five required courses include 101, 260, 355, 381 internship, 400 level seminar; five electives include at least one course in each area, (areas described below), of which at least one is at the 200 level, and one is at the 300 level.

All College requirements will be met by existing courses. Writing in the major will be fulfilled by IDS 260. Speaking in the major is completed in IDS 381 and 490 with required oral presentations. Ethics will be fulfilled in IDS 101 and the 400 level seminar. Research is fulfilled in 101 and 490.

Required for a Minor: The minor consists of 7 courses (28 credit hours). Two required courses include 101 or 260, and 355, at least one course from each of two areas, and two electives (of which at least one is at the 200 level or above), plus 400 level seminar.


Identity Studies Areas
If a student wants to specialize, they can choose an emphasis area in Gender and Sexuality, Race and Ethnicity, or Body Studies. In addition to the required course in this area, two electives and a 400-level seminar can be in the specialty area (up to 4 courses). Students should consult with their advisor as specializations are not tracked on program evaluations.

Gender/Sexuality

Courses in this area are centrally informed by questions about gender and sexuality, or gender and sexuality are the central topic of investigation. 


IDS 138 Human Sexuality
IDS 195 Biology of Race and Sex
IDS 212 Sex in the Bible and Qur'an
IDS 220 Experiencing Mahayana Buddhism
IDS 225 Women in Science
IDS 233 God and Gender
IDS 240 Africana Women's Writing
IDS 242 Sociology of Gender
IDS 245 Literature by Women
IDS 254 Politics, Policy and Gender
IDS 270 Psychology and Aging
IDS 290 Gender and Women's History
IDS 300 Critical Theories
IDS 331 Gender, Health and Medicine
IDS 335 Masculinity in Film
IDS 350 Gendered Activism in a Global Context
IDS 351 Gender and Crime
IDS 361 Chaucer and Medieval Literature
IDS 368 Gender in Art
IDS 468 Seminar: Gender, Globalization and Development

Race/Ethnicity
Courses in this area are centrally informed by questions about race and ethnicity, or constructs of race and ethnicity are the central topic of investigation. Courses may also celebrate the unique contributions of peoples defined by embodied identities. 


IDS 135 African-American History
IDS 142 China in the World
IDS 147 Literature of the African Peoples
IDS 161 East Asian History
IDS 162 South Asian History
IDS 171 History of Africa to 1880
IDS 172 History of Modern Africa
IDS 202 From Buddhist Texts to Anime
IDS 221 Anthropology in East Africa: Forces of Culture Change Among the Maasai
IDS 228 Religion and Philosophy in  China
IDS 235 The Long Civil Rights Era: Black Nationalism to Black Power
IDS 236 Disaster and Enlightenment: Pilgrimages East Asia
IDS 238 Islamophobia
IDS 240 Africana Women's Writing
IDS 246 Chinese Cinema and Chinese Modernity
IDS 247 History of Jazz
IDS 251 African-American Literature
IDS 255 Religious Identity and Diversity in East Asia
IDS 262 Everybody Loves Gandhi
IDS 271 African Diaspora
IDS 333 Rhetoric of Identity and Difference
IDS 345 Constructs of Race and Racialization
HIST 361 Topics in Asian History
IDS 371 Topics in African History


Body Studies

Courses in this area cohesively integrate thinking through the body, interweaving theory and applied, guided, or improvisational bodily practice within the course of study. The physical practice is guided by clear conceptual guidance, research, and, development for all abilities. Emphasizing movement, demeanor, and inhabited/lived space, Body Studies courses focus on understanding through the body while also documenting from the body. This process emphasizes the innate intelligence, or intuition, of one's body - unique in experiences and culture, ideas and ideology, and, thinking, moving, and being within the self, other, and world.

IDS 105 Movement Fundamentals I: Practices of Alignment and Function
IDS 130 Contact Improvisation
IDS 140 Identity and Movement Analysis
IDS 205 Movement Fundamentals II: Practices of Range and Efficiency
IDS 220 Experiencing Mahayana Buddhism
IDS 239 Disability and Literature
IDS 305 Movement Fundamentals III: Practices of Vocabulary and Intention
IDS 352 Moving History
IDS 360 Dance Composition

Current 400-level seminars include the following Paideia 450s:
"The Color of Change: Black Intellectual Thought and Social Change in America", "Re-imagining Race through Speculative Fiction", "Queering Subjectivities", "Working Japan" (Study Abroad), "Love and Gender in China", "Bodies, Sticks, and Mindfulness", "Ritual and Performance in Japan", "War and Reconciliation in Cambodia", "Practicing Embodiment", and "Stability and Change in Vietnam".
 
As well as IDS 468 "Gender, Globalization, and Development", SOC 472 Seminar: "Social Institutions and Inequalities" and PHIL 485 Critical Theories. Other 400 level courses accepted upon approval.

View program learning goals for an explanation of learning outcomes for Identity Studies.

An Africana Studies minor is also housed in Identity Studies. 

Identity Studies Courses

IDS 101 Systems of Power

  • 4 hours

This interdisciplinary introductory class explores the interactions of the many dimensions of privilege and inequality, such as race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, health status, and citizenship, and the ways in which these systems of power interact and shape social identities. We examine key theories and case studies that shed light on the cultural, social, economic, and political climates that create variation in social stratification across time and space. We engage such fields of inquiry as study of gender and sexuality, critical race theory, feminism, post-colonial studies, theories of embodiment, and many others. By reading scholarly works as well as examining arts, literature, and popular culture, we will come to critical understanding of social inequality and social justice. (previously WGST 130).

IDS 105 Movement Fundamentals I: Practices of Alignment and Function

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression

An introductory movement course exploring vital integrative connections between somatic practice and performance preparation. Somatic skills including dynamic alignment and functional anatomy provide the groundwork for embodied movement exploration. The study and practice of dynamic alignment and embodied anatomy unfolds new relationships between physical function and expression. (Same as DAN 105)

IDS 130 Contact Improvisation

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Skills, Human Behavior, Human Expression

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of contact improvisation, a dance form that explores elements of physical contact among participants while challenging preconceptions about the gendered body. Emphasis will be placed on finding mindful and physical ways to prepare to be "ready" to dance: cultivating a quiet core amidst the wilderness of physical disorientation; finding the root of levity, contact point, weight sharing, and physical pathways into the floor and air; and focusing attention on the details of sensation. Students will engage in egalitarian practices for building physical skills of trust, receptivity, and responsiveness, as well as physical tolerance for waiting in the unknown.(Same as DAN 130)

IDS 135 African-American History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical, Intercultural

This course is a survey of African-American history from the 15th century to the present. Eras and topics include the trans-Atlantic slave trade, slavery in the Americas, the Civil War and Emancipation, segregation, the Great Migration, the Great Depression and World War II, the modern black freedom struggle, and the post-civil rights era. The class emphasizes how African Americans constructed individual and collective selves, created livelihoods, formed families, communities, and institutions, fashioned cultures, defined citizenship, and consistently defied notions of a monolithic "black community." Centering African Americans' words, actions, and artistic creations and the ways they interacted with other cultures and peoples within the Americas and abroad, this course investigates how African Americans shaped and were shaped by the many worlds they traversed. (Same as HIST 135 and AFRS 135).

IDS 138 Human Sexuality

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior

A study of the field of human sexuality. The origins of sex roles, myths, stereotypes, and realities of this important aspect of life will be presented. The complexity of the sociological, psychological, biological, and legal components of the sexual being will also be included. The classis open to all students on campus. (Same as NURS 138)

IDS 140 Identity & Movement Analysis

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts

This course introduces the student to basic principles and elements underlying dance and movement expression and experience for analyzing the moving body in the spontaneous to the performative. Students investigate from the role of "witness-spectator" or "participant-observer" how the body is both generative to identity and a location for identity through various structures (both live and recorded) of mundane, social, cultural, theatrical, ritualized, dance and movement practices. The relationship between the inner motivation of movement and the outer expression of the body is analyzed to understand intellectual, emotional, and physical responses.

IDS 142 China in the World

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Intercultural

This course explores the importance of China in a rapidly globalized world from an intercultural perspective. Students are invited to examine how China interacts with the world, and vice versa, through a variety of issues. The course begins with an interdisciplinary project that offers students a gateway to explore the global presence of China. After a comparative study of origin myth and flood in China and the West, the course continues with an examination of cross-cultural education, during which students will complete an interview project. Both Chinese cuisine and the topic of "made in China" will be essential parts of this course, but students will also be able to explore topics of personal interest, such as Hollywood's representation of Chinese culture, international adoption or the Dalai Lama. With class discussion and student-led projects, this interdisciplinary course will provide a basic understanding of Chinese culture and tradition. (Same as FCUL 142)

IDS 147 Literature of the African Peoples

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Historical, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent

Modern African writers are some of the most dynamic and innovative writers as they draw from and respond to different literary traditions, such as their own oral and written traditions, as well as European models. This course serves as an introduction to the various themes and styles of written literature of the 20th century. Central to discussion will be an analysis of gender within various African cultural contexts. Understanding constructions of masculinity and femininity, dominant female and male roles in society, and the ways in which the works challenge traditional norms of gender will be priorities within applied theoretical approaches. (Same as ENG 147 and AFRS 147)

IDS 161 East Asian History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical, Intercultural

An introduction to the basic themes and content of East Asian history, from the earlist times to the present. Students will explore the lives of both great and ordinary people who lived in what are now China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Students will consider how empire, international trade, relations of production, and ideologies affected the construction and reproduction of social and cultural groups. Offered alternate years. (Same as HIST 161)

IDS 162 South Asian History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical, Intercultural

An introduction to the basic themes and content of South Asian history from the earliest times to the present. Students will explore the lives of both great and ordinary people who lived in what are now Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal. Students will consider how empire, international trade, relations of production, and ideologies affected the construction and reproduction of social and cultural groups. Offered alternate years. (Same as HIST 162)

IDS 171 History of Africa to 1880

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical

Survey of African history from the earliest times to roughly about 1880. The course begins with the historical development of Africa's still-vital cultural, linguistic, social and economic systems and moves on to examine the Islamic and Christian impact on these systems through the era of Atlantic slave trade. The course concludes by discussing the ways in which early European colonialism affected the African past. (Same as HIST 171 and AFRS 171).

IDS 172 History of Modern Africa

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical, Intercultural

This course surveys the history of sub-Saharan Africa from the 1880s to the present. The course examines African life under European colonial domination (from about 1880 to about 1960) and under independent states which succeeded colonial governments after 1960. A primary aim of this course is to explore the diversity of human experience in Africa during the colonial and post-colonial periods. The course makes use of several primary documents to portray ways in which men and women have dealt with the challenges of living in 20th- and 21st-century Africa. (Same as HIST 172 and AFRS 172)

IDS 195 Biology of Race and Sex

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Natural World—Nonlab
  • Prerequisites: Junior standing

This course will introduce students to basic concepts of inheritance and expression of genotypes into phenotypes, using the inheritance of sex and race-associated traits as case studies. These complex traits are useful examples of the influence of individual genes, genomes, and the physical environment on phenotypes. Not intended for biology majors. (Same as BIO 195)

IDS 202 From Buddhist Texts to Anime

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural, Religion
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, REL 111 or REL 112

This course examines religious themes in and the religious function of various narrative forms in Japan. The course will examine primary scriptures and commentaries from the Buddhist tradition as well as ghost stories, poems, plays (No and Kabuki), novels, manga, and anime. These literary forms are a product of various interactions among the Japanese, Chinese, and American cultures. Analyzing these kinds of cultural and religious expressions, the course examines the role of religious ritual and sacred texts in pre-modern as well as contemporary Japan. The course deepens the skills in textual and literary criticism introduced in the courses fulfilling the Bible requirement. It will also introduce students to critical theory (including gender and queer studies), and intercultural analysis. This course exposes students equally to the study of Japanese culture and various methods of textual interpretation. (Same as REL 202)

IDS 203 Rewriting Scripture: From Chronicles to The Qur'an

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, REL 111, or REL 112

Is the text of the Bible fixed and static or has it undergone change and modification over time? In this course, we will consider the widely-recognized phenomenon of the re-written Bible by analyzing evidence that demonstrates textual change. Examples will include the way the book of Chronicles rewrites the history of the Israelite monarchy found in Samuel and Kings, the reworkings of biblical materials in the Dead Sea Scrolls and other early Jewish literature, the textual fluidity of early New Testament manuscripts, and the reworking of biblical materials in the Qur'an. Attention will be given to how the changing circumstances of religious communities influence the transmission of the texts they deem authoritative. (Same as REL 203)

IDS 205 Movement Fundamentals II: Practices of Range and Efficiency

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression
  • Prerequisites: DAN 105

An intermediate movement course building technical practice from basic somatic skills. This technique course supports awareness of individual movement patterns and sequences allowing for the development of new movement possibilities. This increased range and efficiency opens the door to new levels of creative expression in communication and performance. This course may be repeated twice. (Same as DAN 205)

IDS 220 Experiencing Mahayana Buddhism

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Intercultural, Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, 111, or 112.

This course introduces students to Mahayana Buddhism. It explores the development of Mahayana Buddhism, its relationship with other religious traditions, and its influence on culture. The primary teaching method is experiential. Students will visit temples in selected areas of East Asia, have instructions by an abbot, participate in the monastic life, will meet scholars of Buddhism, visit holy sites, and participate in Buddhist worship. The students will spend three days in a temple, joining the monks in meditation and religious practice. In addition to this experiential dimension, the course will familiarize students with the history, scriptures, and beliefs of Mahayana Buddhism through readings from primary texts, lectures, videos, and class discussions. It will further analyze the Buddhist response to general topics and problems, such as the absolute, the notion of self, the problem of human existence, as well as soteriological and ethical issues. (Same as REL 220)

IDS 221 Anthropology in East Africa: Forces of Culture Change Among the Massai

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Intercultural

The Maasai pastoralists of Tanzania and Kenya are experiencing rapid culture change in response to global, national, and local forces. In this course we will study "traditional" Maasai culture and examine the ways in which the Maasai of northern Tanzania are adapting to changing social, political, economic, and environmental conditions. Topics to be explored include the shift from herding to agropastoralism; the tension between traditional and formal modes of education; the adoption of Christianity in place of or alongside traditional religion; changes in coming-of-age rituals; cultural dimensions of health, illness and healing; challenges to traditional gender ideology; the Maasai relationship to their environment; and the impacts of ecotourism, cultural tourism, and wildlife conservation programs on the pastoral way of life. From bases near the city of Arusha and the small town of Monduli students will interact with Maasai people in urban and rural marketplaces; in schools, medical facilities, and places of worship; and at Maasai bomas (family compounds) in the bush. We will also visit the Ngorongoro Crater Conservation area and the Oldoinyo Lengai volcano and pilgrimage routes in in order to explore the tension between pastoralism, wildlife conservation programs, and tourism. Offered January term. (Same as ANTH 221 and AFRS 221)

IDS 225 Women in Science

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Natural World—Nonlab

This course studies various topics in the sciences by looking at great discoveries of female scientists. The class will start by examining scientific methodology, research, and process as well as an introduction to the various field of science. The history of women in science is followed by through daily reading assignments. In addition to the history and science taught by the instructor, students will be responsible for an in-depth project on an individual female scientist, studying both the science and other aspects of her life. The class will include some student-led class discussions and oral presentations, along with class lecture, activities assignments and tests. (Same as SCI 225)

IDS 228 Religion and Philosophy in China

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, REL 111 or REL 112

This course examines the religious and philosophical traditions of China, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, to understand their influence on Chinese and East Asian culture. It will trace these traditions from their beginnings and formative periods to today and explore their influence on the current worldviews, rituals, festivals, literature, practices, ethics, and politics in China. Special consideration will be given to the notion of "religion," the construction of gender, as well as moral and political visions found in the foundational texts of these traditions. (Same as REL 228)

IDS 233 God and Gender

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Human Expression, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, 111 or 112

An investigation of how our understanding and experience of gender are connected to our views of God, human beings, and the natural world. The course explores the works of a variety of thinkers and pays special attention to issues raised by feminist theologians who stand both inside and outside the Christian tradition. Possible topics include: language about God, human sexuality, views of women in the Bible, the nature of biblical authority, the feminist movement, the men's movement, images of nature in Western religious thought, and the ordination of women. (same as Rel 233)

IDS 235 The Long Civil Rights Era: Black Nationalism to Black Power

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical

Adopting a "Long Civil Rights Movement" framework, we will examine how African Americans adopted various strategies to bring effective meaning tot their citizenship status and expand the boundaries of American democracy. Instead of limiting our study to the "classical phase" of the movement between 1954 and the early 1970s, we will begin in the 1930s and end with contemporary activism such as the Black Live Matter movement. Through an extended periodization of what is traditionally considered the Civil Rights Movement, the class reveals how the struggle for civil rights was not a singular moment in the mid 20th century, by a sustained, multidimensional, ideologically diverse movement that continues to the present. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, we will pay particular attention to the regional dynamics of African American civil rights movements and the role of gender in these movements. (same as HIST 235 and AFRS 235)

IDS 236 Disaster and Enlightenment: Pilgrimages East Asia

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression, Intercultural, Religion
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, 111, or 112.

This course explores traditional and new forms of pilgrimages in East Asia. In particular, it examines two kinds of pilgrimages: traditional ones to sacred mountains, sanctuaries, and other religious pilgrimage sites, on the one side, and pilgrimages to memorials that commemorate immense natural and human catastrophes such as Hiroshima (dropping of the atomic bomb) and Nanjing (1937/8 massacre), on the other. What connects these two kinds of pilgrimages is the importance attributed to memory, the desire for healing, and the need for reflection. The goal of this course is to investigate the religious and political dimensions of memory, self-cultivation, and contemplation. The course accomplishes this goal by examining questions such as: what is the social dimension of religious pilgrimages, what is the moral dimension of memory, and what is the spiritual dimension of healing and reconciliation? Offered only during January term. (Same as REL 236)

IDS 238 Islamophobia

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Historical, Human Expression—Primary Texts, Religion
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, REL 111, or REL 112

Islamophobia is a contested concept that is often employed to capture the fears of and prejudices toward Muslims and Islam in the West. This course will explore this controversy and Western perceptions of Muslims and Islam by critically engaging the following questions: What is Islamophobia, and how does it relate to other prejudices such as racism and anti-Semitism? What are the theological, historical, political, and cultural forces that have given rise to perceptions of Islam as inherently violent, intolerant, misogynist, and backwards? How does Islamophobia differ from legitimate disagreements with specific Islamic beliefs and practices? What impact have negative perceptions of Islam had on the free exercise of religion for Muslims in the West? What do these perceptions of Muslims and Islam reveal about Western assumptions concerning religion and the religious Other? (Same as REL 238)

IDS 240 Africana Women's Writing

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent

A study of writing by selected Africana women writers from Africa, the Caribbean, the United States and elsewhere in the African diaspora. Topics may vary by geographic region or theme. (Same as ENG 240 and AFRS 240)

IDS 242 Sociology of Gender

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods
  • Prerequisites: SOC 101

Examines the gendered structure of our everyday lives; makes gendered assumptions and practices explicit, and uncovers the impact of gender in the social world. Emphasis on historical and cross-cultural constructions of gender that provide alternatives to gender inequality and a basis for social change. (Same as SOC 242)

IDS 245 Literature By Women

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent

A study of how women writers from different historical periods use poems, stories, essays, and plays to address gender issues in the private and the public world. The course looks at how literature both presents and critiques culture and its construction of gender, as well as how it offers new visions and choices for women and men. Readings include such writers as Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Gloria Anzaldua, and Octavia Butler. (Same as ENG 245)

IDS 246 Chinese Cinema and Chinese Modernity

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural

From the fall of the Celestial Empire to the rise of China's economy today, Chinese cinema has witnessed many social changes in the modern era. This course will focus on the interaction between Chinese cinema and the process of modernization. By examining how Chinese films dialogue with Hollywood, it will explore Chinese people's experiences of semi-colonial modernity, socialist modernity and postsocialist/global modernity. Students will watch select films made in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Along with reading and writing assignments, students will be required to do oral presentations. All films have English subtitles. All readings are in English. Students with Chinese language background may elect to enroll in CHIN 246 for additional assignments in Chinese.

IDS 247 History of Jazz

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Historical, Intercultural

A survey of the history and development of jazz, from the 1890s to the present. Includes origins and early jazz through the modern jazz era. Listening activities focus on the major figures of each historical period. Offered alternate years. (Same as MUS 247 and AFRS 247)

IDS 251 African-American Literature

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent

A survey of African-American literature with special attention to the intersection of race, class, and gender as writers engage with the struggle to achieve the democratic promises of freedom, justice and equality. Primary emphasis will be on literature written since 1920 when the Harlem Renaissance began. Includes authors such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Zola Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison. (Same as ENG 251 and AFRS 251)

IDS 253 Sex in the Bible and the Qur'an

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, 111, or 112

This course will explore constructions of gender and sexuality in the Bible and the Qur'an. Students will be introduced to contemporary theories of gender and sexuality that they will use to analyze primary texts intertextually in relation to their culutural contexts. Specific topics may include competing representations of men and women, different constructions of marriage, the use of marriage as a metaphor, and representations of homoeroticism. (Same as REL 253)

IDS 254 Politics, Policy and Gender

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods

This course examines the role of gender in politics and political systems. We will discuss electoral politics, political movements, policies, and policy-makers, all while considering the impact of gender on these political phenomenon. We will also explore the rise in the number of women elected to political offices in the US and across the globe. (Same as POLS 254)

IDS 255 Religious Identity and Diversity in East Asia

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Religion, Human Expression, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: REL 101, REL 111, or REL 112

A study of the ways in which religious identity is constructed and negotiated in China, Korea, and Japan. This course investigates concrete encounters between various Buddhist, Confucian, Daoist, and Shinto schools, institutions, thinkers, and practitioners as well as between political entities and cultural traditions alike; explores variations of the "three teachings in one" as they are expressed in religious myths, especially those involving martial art heroes, meditation manuals, and religious practice in East Asia; and analyzes the theoretical models developed to explain the diversity of beliefs, practices, and cultures in East Asia. This course will provide an in-depth understanding of East Asian religions and cultures and the interaction among them as well as engaging models of religious identity and diversity. (Same as REL 255)

IDS 260 Identity and Power

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Human Behavior
  • Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or one course in identity studies.

A study of contemporary critical race and gender theories, concentrating on the ways social categories such as race, class, gender, and sexuality interact with each other in the formation of personal and political identity. Attention will be paid to the way power structures contribute to limiting or expanding human freedom and to feminist and intersectional methodologies.

IDS 262 Everybody Loves Gandhi

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Historical

M. K. Gandhi remains the Indian most indelibly associated with India, one of the most frequently-quoted thinkers of all time, and one of the most important figures in developing the theory and practice of non-violent resistance. However, Gandhi's ideas and philosophy have managed to become detached from the historical context in which they were created, and indeed from the human being who created them. This course examines Gandhi's life, political positions, and political legacies in India and globally, in an effort to re-evaluate his achievements and failures, to place his life within the broader historical context of India in the early twentieth century, and to consider the reasons why some people, since his death, have variously beatified and demonized the man and his ideas. (Same as HIST 262)

IDS 264 Performance Research: The Happenings Course

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression

This experiential studio and field course will provide the student with theories, practices and performance opportunities based in creating site-specific "happenings" both on and off campus, inspired by the (American) avant-garde theatre. Students will configure and implement performance scores based in concepts of attracting attention and creating a gathering within the mundane domain. The intensity of the research is based in uncompromising realism and raw and unmediated ways in which artists confront experiences in collusion with audiences from real time in order to investigate new levels of understanding perceptual or psychological states of being human. This performance research attempts to open a disquieting discourse on contemporary daily life. Recommended for the student interested in performance and art, the historical (American) avant-garde and creating community. (Same as DAN 264)

IDS 270 Psychology and Aging

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior
  • Prerequisites: PSYC 130

This course is designed to examine psychological aspects of growing older in the 21st century. Students will be introduced to the current methodologies used to study aging as we explore the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes in individuals over the age of 60. The lecture, readings and assignments will address a range of topics that include expected versus abnormal changes in memory, creativity, the shifting roles of the elderly in family and society, and coping with illness and loss. In light of the fact that individuals over the age of 85 are the fastest-growing segment of the global population, and that the majority are women (approximately 2:1), we will also study changes associated with gender roles and sexuality during our later years. A major goal for this course is to foster a clearer understanding of the processes associated with normal aging and to dispel a number of the stereotypes that surround this time of life. (Same as PSYC 270)

IDS 271 African Diaspora

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Historical, Intercultural

This course explores the global experiences of people of African descent. Students will study the human experiences of Africans in the Indian Ocean world, the trans-Saharan trade and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Geographical areas include Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Particular attention will be given to the web of interrelated histories, social dynamics, political, and economic processes affecting and reflecting world cultures and histories. (Same as HIST 271 and AFRS 271)

IDS 290 Gender and Women's History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Historical

Faculty teaching this course will focus on the history of gender within their own period of expertise. The course will examine such gender questions as: Why and how should we study the history of gender? What do gender roles from the past tell us about our own gender experience? How do the histories of men and women as gendered persons intersect? The course will focus on these questions as they are related to the history of work, family, politics, and social behavior for the particular period and nation the instructor selects. (Same as HIST 290)

IDS 300 Critical Theories

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: One course in philosophy or 2 courses in art, art history, communication studies, english, identity studies, political science and sophomore standing.

A study of the intellectual history and theories that inform contemporary western social & cultural criticism. Attention will be paid to the way that contemporary movements in feminism, queer liberation, racial justice, and disability activism serve as critical and practical responses to social, economic and cultural forces. Student will develop projects related to their major or other area of interest in order to apply critical theory within the context of their disciplinary background. (same as PHIL 300)

IDS 305 Movement Fundamentals III: Practices of Vocabulary and Intention

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression
  • Prerequisites: DAN 205

This is an advanced movement course focusing on crystallizing performance skills through the development of individual movement versatility and invention. Practice of technique builds from somatic skills and contemporary dance vocabulary through both technical phrasing and improvisational scoring. Depth of integrative practice prepares the mover to refine movement vocabulary and clarify movement vocabulary and intention. This course may be repeated. (Same as DAN 305)

IDS 331 Gender, Health and Medicine

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior

This class will invite students to examine gender and health issues around the globe. We will take an interdisciplinary perspective, which will involve readings in women and gender studies, anthropology, sociology, public health, and related disciplines. The course will focus on 3 major themes: equity and androcentrism in health care and health research, medicalization of bodily experiences, and reproductive health. We will address these issues both in domestic and global contexts. Our goal is to understand how bodies and health are connected to the politics of gender, race, and class, as well as to see how people have made sense of their bodies, desires, identities, suffering, and resistance to the various dimensions of oppression. This course counts as theory requirement for the WGST major. Offered alternate years.

IDS 333 Rhetoric of Identity and Difference

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Intercultural

This course examines the role of rhetoric in such significant identity categories as race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, nationality, and ability. Focusing on historical and contemporary political discourse, protest movements, and media representations, students examine how people navigate individual, cultural, and national identities as they strive for social justice.

IDS 335 Masculinity in Film

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: COMS 133 or IDS 101

This course takes a feminist perspective to analyze portrayals of sex and gender in film with a particular emphasis on representations of men and masculinity. The focus is on how films construct different notions of gender, how films can be read in different ways, and to what social uses film portrayals may be put. The course includes lectures on film criticism, gender theory, and theories of representation, as well as screenings and discussion. (Same as COMS 335)

IDS 345 Constructs of Race and Racialization

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: SOC 101

This course examines the social construction of race as a concept and the racialization of US society. An assessment of how racialization has changed over time and has created various interactions between groups from Whites and enslaved Africans, Mexicans and Native Americans to present day race relations. We also examine how racialization both determines and impacts social structures and the attainment of societal honors, rewards and power in modern society. (Same as SOC 345 and AFRS 345)

IDS 350 Gendered Activism in a Global Context

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior, Intercultural

This course will explore varied expressions of activism at the community, national, and transnational levels, asking in what ways activism can be gendered and what gendered activism actually means for the lives of men and women around the world. Our understanding of gendered activism is informed by a richly comparative perspective that deals with topics such as war, peace, poverty, and globalization, and draws from ethnographic materials that give voice to activists from diverse regions of the world.

IDS 351 Gender and Crime

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods
  • Prerequisites: SOC 101

Examines how gender affects individuals' experiences as both victims and perpetrators of crime and deviance. Analyzes the history and theory of gender and crime in the U.S. and internationally, the social construction of victimization, and the impact of culture, structure, and inequality on criminal behavior. (Same as SOC 351)

IDS 352 Moving History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Historical

This course studies a breadth of representative dance artists and practices from the ancient period to the present in order to understand intercultural and cross-cultural developments in both American and World Dance. African, American, Asian, Indigenous, and European dance forms are included, with a focus on figures and conventions which questions the construction of history and the canonization of certain dances, dance artists, and points of view. Dance and choreography are analyzed in relation to their historical, artistic, social, political, and global contexts. Depth is accomplished through individual scholarly research projects on a subject of the student's choosing, and experiential projects focused on a particular dance artist or artistic concept.

IDS 355 Global Traditions

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Intercultural

This course focuses on literary and philosophical texts from across the world that explore the link between social systems of power and social identities. Literary fiction and non-fiction, sacred spiritual manuscripts, philosophical treatises, and music compositions are just a few examples of creative works that explore notions of privilege and inequality. The course will introduce students to rich global "texts" that highlight how intellectuals have sought to examine these realities in their respective cultural locations. Narrative analysis, the interpretation of "story", will serve as the window into understanding "intersectionality", that being the unique ways in which systems of power coalesce to create unique subjectivities and identities.

IDS 360 Dance Composition

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression
  • Prerequisites: DAN 101, DAN 105, THE 127, or ART 104

This course introduces the basic tools of dance-making, while exploring the development and crafting of movement within time, space, and design elements. Consideration of compositional methods in other art forms-theatre, music, visual art, literature-will inform the development of skills for creating dance/movement events. Students will prepare solo and group studies for informal performances and observe, discuss, and critique their work as they learn how to see dance as well as make it. (Same as DAN 360)

IDS 361 Chaucer and Medieval Literature

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: Junior standing

From heroes fighting monsters to Arthurian romances, medieval literature is best known for its stories of chivalry. Less well-known but equally wonderful are the comic tales ofpeople having sex in trees and greedy friars dividing a fart. Readings in this course include the heroic epic of Beowulf, narrative poems about love and adventure by Marie de France, the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and several of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. We will particularly explore how these medieval texts construct sex, gender, and sexuality. We will also examine how 21st century fantasies of the medieval period have generated mistaken ideas about race and ethnicity. Centuries have passed, but medieval constructions of identity continue to inform our lives in powerful ways today. (Same as IDS 361)

IDS 368 Gender in Art

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: ART 252 or IDS 101

Taking Linda Nochlin's seminal essay, "Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?" as our starting point, this course will explore the place of gender in the history of art. We will explore both images of men and images of women, as well as the differing roles afforded to male and female artists across time. We will examine assumptions we and others make about women, gender, art, culture, queer theory, and feminism. (Same as ARTH 368)

IDS 371 Topics in African History

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Historical
  • Prerequisites: PAID 112 or transfer equivalent.

In-depth study of a selected topic in African history. Instruction in this course will require students to read and assess monographs by African historians on the topic. Topics may include but are not limited to apartheid in South Africa and Zimbabwe, decolonization, nationalism, environmental history of sub-Saharan Africa. (Same as AFRS 371 and HIST 371)

IDS 381 Internship

  • 1, 2, or 4 hours

IDS 468 Seminar: Gender, Globalization, and Development

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Behavior—Social Science Methods, Intercultural
  • Prerequisites: SOC 101

In this course we will examine the phenomena of globalization and development from a sociology of gender perspective. We will focus on the global intersections of contemporary societies and cultures, and the gendered dynamics therein. Questions we will raise include: How does globalization affect women's and men's lives? How is power distributed, and how does this impact development processes? What impact do gender dynamics play in the social institutions of development: econmomic, political, and cultural? (Same as SOC 468)

IDS 490 Senior Project

  • 1, 2, or 4 hours